HBCU votes do matter

 

HBCU students fought for the right to vote in the 1960’s; today they demonstrated that black millennial do practice that right when Texas Southern University students marched down the Tiger Walk to cast their votes at St. James Episcopal Church on Southmore.

On March 4, 1960, TSU students unraveled the concept of the Jim Crow laws by doing sit- ins at restaurants, supermarkets; anywhere where they could portray that action spoke louder than words.

Texas Southern University Public Relations major, Valerie Madison says that the history behind voting is what gives her a drive to always get out and vote.

“I was inspired by my ancestors; I mean just knowing the history beyond the black votes and knowing where I want the black votes to be now,” said Madison. “If I didn’t do this for me, then I definitely did this for the people before and after me.”

Student Government Association known as SGA organized this march as a way to bring awareness to TSU campus as well as prove to the world those HBCU’s- black communities do use their right to vote freely.

The student had one simple quest and that was to make sure that African Americans voices were being heard on the ballots.

25- year-old TSU Broadcast student, Leslie Vasquez says that she is the voice for Hispanic people, considering that their votes were presumably high this election.

“Voting means a lot as a citizen because my parents might be immigrants and they might not be able to vote, so I think I do it for them,” said Vasquez.

When the students finally reached their destination at St. James Episcopal Church they applauded themselves and got in line to cast their votes.

Shuttle buses were also provided as a way of transportation to get students to and from their voting precincts.

 

 

 

 

 

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